Japan News: Russian aggression undermining Japan-Ukraine radioactivity research project

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is jeopardizing a joint Japan-Ukraine research project into radioactive materials, among other subjects.

Kenji Nanba, director at Fukushima University’s Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, talked about the war’s adverse effects on scientific cooperation in a recent interview with The Yomiuri Shimbun. The following are excerpts from the interview:

  • In 2017, Fukushima University’s Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, where I serve as director, and the University of Tsukuba launched a joint, large-scale project with research organizations in Ukraine. The project aims to measure the movement of radioactive materials in forests and rivers in the off-limits zone set up within a 30-kilometer-radius of the Chornobyl plant.
  • In 2017, Fukushima University’s Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, where I serve as director, and the University of Tsukuba launched a joint, large-scale project with research organizations in Ukraine. The project aims to measure the movement of radioactive materials in forests and rivers in the off-limits zone set up within a 30-kilometer-radius of the Chornobyl plant.
  • Five researchers from Fukushima University had been scheduled to travel to Ukraine to conduct observations in the area around Chornobyl in mid-March. However, Russia’s invasion of its neighbor meant the trip had to be suspended. We have no idea how things will turn out. We could lose valuable data and observation equipment. Even if our work were to continue, we would likely have to make drastic changes.
“I was deeply shocked by Russia’s shelling of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. Even if the attack was not intended to trigger an accident, radioactive materials could have been released. If the plant’s water pipes and power supply system had been damaged and thus unable to cool the spent nuclear fuel, there could have been a catastrophe. The Ukrainian government has estimated that an accident at the plant would be 10 times bigger than the Chornobyl tragedy.”
Read more via Japan News

You can support our team and donate to TechUkraine here.

Ukrainian entrepreneurs donate to the military-1
Support Ukraine!
  • Come Back Alive is one of the largest charitable foundations that supports Ukrainian soldiers, founded by the IT specialist Vitaliy Deynega. The organization collected more than 210 million UAH (more than $7M) in 2014. According to Na chasi, the Patreon page Come Back Alive is in the top ten projects by the number of financial donations.
  • Army SOS, which develops drones;
  • Everybody Can, an organization that supports internally displaced people;
  • Help on the Ministry of Defense website.
#StrongerTogether
#staywithukraine
Menu